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Events


October 2022

Celebrating Archtober with the Center For Architecture

IN THE REALM OF INDIGENOUS ARCHITECTURE

Join us for the ‘In the Realm of Indigenous Architectures’ series, developed in collaboration with the Center for Architecture. In the Realm of Indigenous Architectures presents built projects, architectural tools, and historical policy illustrating the preservation of culture and transformation of Indigenous communities in the United States today.

October 4, 2022

IN THE REALM OF INDIGENOUS ARCHITECTURE
Part I
Architectural Tools and Technology for Tribal Communities

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Miriam Diddy (Hopi, Navajo) is a planner and GIS specialist and has worked on planning, mapping, and community engagement efforts for several tribes across the Southwest. While at AOS Architects, Diddy was the lead designer coding and building the award-winning Zuni Housing Authority mobile app, which collects housing and demographics data on nearly 2,000 homes at Zuni Pueblo. Diddy will highlight the importance of architectural tools and technology for tribal communities and share her experience developing the app and its potential expansive use for other departments or tribes in the future.

Speaker:
Miriam Diddy (Hopi + Navajo), AICAE, Planner, MRWM

About the Speaker:
Miriam Diddy is a planner and GIS specialist. She has a BA in environmental planning and design from UNM. Diddy has assisted on planning and building assessment/inventory efforts for several tribal clients, including the Pueblos of Zuni, Laguna, Cochiti, Santo Domingo, and San Ildefonso. As part of these efforts, she has developed a mobile phone app geared towards the assessment of historic structures in traditional tribal communities that has been customized for multiple clients to streamline data collection and reinforce data sovereignty in Indian Country. Born and raised in New Mexico, Diddy is a member of the Navajo Nation (Diné) with additional Hopi and Ukrainian heritage. She currently volunteers for several non-profits including as Secretary for the American Indian Council of Architects and Engineers (AICAE) and as a Steering Committee Member for the Tribal + Indigenous Planning Division of the American Planning Association (APA). She also serves as Board Member for Creative Startups, a non-profit with the mission of helping individuals successfully launch creative businesses and entrepreneurs that help drive the creative economy.

October 11, 2022

IN THE REALM OF INDIGENOUS ARCHITECTURE
Part II
The Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative

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In June 2021, Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland announced the Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative, a comprehensive effort to recognize the troubled legacy of federal Indian boarding school policies, with the goal of addressing their intergenerational impact and to shed light on the traumas of the past. The federal Indian boarding school policies introduced a new architecture and program to American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian communities in the 19th and 20th centuries. In this program, Joaquin Gallegos (Jicarilla Apache, Santa Ana Pueblo), Special Assistant to the Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs at the US Department of Interior, will summarize the findings of this extensive and first-ever inventory of federally operated Indian boarding schools.  
Speaker:
Joaquin Gallegos (Jicarilla Apache + Santa Ana Pueblo), Special Assistant to Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs, US Department of Interior

October 18, 2022

IN THE REALM OF INDIGENOUS ARCHITECTURE
Part III
The Albuquerque Indian Boarding School

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Following on last week's talk on Federal Indian Boarding School, Dr. Ted Jojola (Isleta Pueblo), will present the story of an anomaly Indian Boarding School: the Albuquerque Indian School (AIS). Jojola will examine how the AIS students' tribal communities were able to exercise their agency, influencing everything from classroom curriculum to school functions. AIS serves as an example of how communities ultimately mitigated the schools' assimilation efforts and assured the cultural, social, and economic survival of their people.

Speaker:
Ted Jojola (Isleta Pueblo), Director, Indigenous Design and Planning Institute, and Distinguished + Regents' Professor, University of New Mexico

October 25, 2022

IN THE REALM OF INDIGENOUS ARCHITECTURE
Part IIII
Affordable Housing and Community at Siler Yard

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Garron Yepa (Navajo, Jemez Pueblo) was born and raised in New Mexico and brings his cultural and regional knowledge to every architectural project as a designer and project manager. Yepa will share information and key insights on the Wa-Di Housing Development for Santo Domingo Pueblo and the Owe’neh Bupingeh Preservation Project for Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo. Yepa will further discuss how these tribal projects informed Siler Yard: Arts+Creativity Center of Santa Fe, the first net-zero energy, 100% electric utilities multi-family project in New Mexico.

Speaker:
Garron Yepa (Navajo + Jemez Pueblo), AOS Architects

About the Speaker:
Garron Yepa was born and raised in New Mexico and brings his cultural and regional knowledge to every architectural project. As the son of a Navajo (Dine) mother, and a Jemez Pueblo (Towa) father Garron has a unique perspective on architecture and design. Being a fluent Towa speaker has given him insight into another way of describing the world around him. He has continued his learning with extended stays in New Hampshire, Alaska, and New York City - always returning home to restore his grounding in his communities.







Miriam Diddy (Hopi + Navajo), AICAE, Planner, MRWM



Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative Investigative Report, U.S. Department of the Interior.
More here: https://www.bia.gov/service/federal-indian-boarding-school-initiative 



Wa-Di Housing Development - Santo Domingo Pueblo, AOS Architects. Image by Minesh Bacrania. 



Garron Yepa (Navajo + Jemez Pueblo), AOS Architects